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© 2019 by All Writey Then . . . 

  • Shannon

Convenience



I wish I had a dollar for every time I’ve counselled agents that people only do business with those they “know, like and trust.”


I’m not the only one ― it's a sales mantra. So, agents across the country try to make themselves appear “mainstream” to win business.


That is such utter b.s.


I had my hair done this week and it cost me $112.00. No color, no highlights – this was for a haircut.


Think about this for a minute. Someone took a pair of scissors to my hair and cut off a quarter inch, where I suggested she cut, then blew it dry and I walked out $112 poorer.


Do I “know like and trust” this woman?


To tell you the truth, I’ve been seeing her for years and I know little about her. She is one of the grumpiest people I’ve ever met so I can’t honestly say I like her and the last time I saw her she did the exact opposite of what I requested ― so, not at all trustworthy.


But I keep going back


So, it's not that I know, like or trust her. It's convenience.


The time it would take me to research a new hair stylist is something I am unwilling to take. Besides, she does a decent haircut most of the time. So, I keep going back.


Amazingly, I’m not alone. NAR says that most real estate consumers work with the first agent they interview or the first agent that returns their calls. Obviously, I’m not the only one who values her time.


It's mind boggling when it comes to a real estate transaction, don't you agree?

While a hair stylist can make you look crummy for a couple of weeks, the wrong real estate agent can screw up a client’s entire financial portfolio. Yet, consumers throw their money out the window for the sake of convenience in real estate transactions as if they are seeing a barber.


So, what am I getting at here? I’m not quite sure. I’m kind of wondering why your services aren't as valued as, say, an attorney.


Isn't the service you provide critical to your clients' bottom lines? Why do so few buyers and sellers Yelp agents? Why don't they research before hiring an agent as much as they do a date-night restaurant?


Is it that they don't get the gravity of their decision or is that they think all agents are alike?

So, what if agents dressed like hair stylists -- a cross between Kim Kardashian and Stevie Nicks -- are terminally late to their appointments and act like God’s gift to the real estate world, would their clients be more loyal?


OK, brandish a set of very intimidating scissors -- will that help?


WHEN will real estate agents get as much respect for what they do as those in service industries?


OK, maybe I’m just way tired and doing a major reach. At any rate, the comparison is interesting, don’t you think?